Recorded Resources - Past EDI.I Events

A resource list of previously recorded EDI.I events hosted by UBC Applied Science. Scroll through recording on past panels, and speaker series to further your path towards anti-oppression and Indigeneity.

  • May 16

    Moose Hide Campaign

    9:00am - 4:00pm | 2332 Main Mall

    Join us in solidarity to take a stand against violence towards women and children while taking practical steps in our collective journey towards reconciliation. Come visit our information table and pick up a moosehide pin (vegan options available) as a way to demonstrate your commitment to healthy masculinity and taking a stand against gendered violence.To learn more visit moosehidecampaign.ca 

  • May 15

    Kairos Blanket Exercise

    9:00am - 12:00pm | UBC Farm (3461 Ross Drive; University Endowment Lands)

    The Blanket Exercise walks participants through the experiences of Indigenous peoples from the time of contact to the present day. This experiential opportunity is an active way to immerse oneself into the effects of colonization. This event is a collaborative effort towards fostering understanding and reconciliation through Indigenous perspectives. We'll gather in a location that allows for an immersive and reflective experience. Join us for a morning of impactful learning. The event is facilitated by Moon Tide Reconciliation and includes participation of a Musqueam elder.

  • Feb 1 to 29

    Black History Month

    10:00am - 4:00am (+28 days)

    February is Black History Month. Browse the pop-up museum in the Kaiser Atrium and rediscover Black history in areas such as engineering, nursing and planning. Enjoy videos focusing on anti-racism in STEM, representation in STEM and personal stories.   

  • Jan 31

    Speaker Series for IDEAL: Indigenous Design and Engagement in Applied Science and Land and Food Systems

    3:00pm - 4:30pm | 6250 Applied Science Ln

    Image Elder Leonard Williams, Quatsino First NationJoin us January 31st at 3:00 p.m. for a special IDEAL Speaker Series with Elder Leonard Williams. Elder Len will discuss the science around harvesting cedar and prepping it for weaving and share the ways of knowing and doing he practices as a traditional cedar weaver. Open to all. Registration in the IDEAL Certificate Program not necessary.Learn more about the IDEAL Certificate.

  • Jun 29

    Pride Month Fireside Chat: Supporting the 2SLGBTQIA+ Community as Allies

    3:00pm - 4:30pm | 6250 Applied Science Ln, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

    REGISTER HERE This is a hybrid event. Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building (CEME), Room 2202.  Zoom link will be sent to participants before the chat. June is the inauguration of “Pride Season,” a term which refers to a range of Pride events happening from June – September. We will be holding a 'fireside chat' guided by Sheryl Staub-French, Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI), Faculty of Applied Science.  Sheryl will be joined by Julia Staub-French and Kim LaForest in a conversation about supporting the 2SLGBTQIA+ community through compassion, understanding, and allyship. Sheryl joined APSC twenty years ago as a professor in civil engineering. As an engineer, lesbian, mother, and leader of EDI.I initiatives in the Faculty, Sheryl will speak to the personal context and challenges faced by queer folks in the Applied Sciences. Julia is the Executive Director of Family Services of the North Shore, a non-profit, community-based agency that has been providing counselling, support and education for families and individuals for over 60 years. As a psychotherapist who has worked with queer clients and developed programs for queer youth, Julia is a leader in the queer community. Kim is Manager of Thrive Family Programs and PROUD2BE Coordinator at Family Services of the North Shore. As an ally and coordinator of the PROUD2BE initiatives, Kim will speak to the experiences of queer children and youth today, particularly non binary and trans youth, and her work supporting parents of gender diverse children and youth We look forward to listening, sharing, and connecting in this open space. All are welcome. ?✨ Speaker & Moderator Image Dr. Sheryl Staub-French, Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI), Faculty of Applied Science Dr. Staub-French is a Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science.  She is Director of the BIM TOPiCS Lab where she leads inter-disciplinary research focused on developing methods and tools to support the digital delivery of sustainable building construction projects through effective and collaborative use of building information modeling (BIM).  As the first Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Faculty of Applied Science, Dr. Staub-French is a strong leader and advocate in advancing EDI in engineering and leading the Faculty’s EDI initiatives. She received her BS in Civil Engineering from Santa Clara University and her MS and PhD from Stanford University. Dana-Lyn Mackenzie, Senior Manager EDI & Indigeneity Dana-Lyn is a member of the Hwlitsum First Nation, based in Canoe Pass, BC and a lawyer. She has practiced criminal, administrative and employment law. She is a double alumna of UBC, having obtained her BA and JD degrees at UBC.  Dana-Lyn has worked as a university administrator since 2012 in Indigenous awareness, programming and student affairs capacities. Dana-Lyn led Indigenous Awareness camps and cultural competency programming during her tenure at the Peter A. Allard School of Law with UBC, where she was recognized for her contributions to this work by being the 2016 recipient of the UBC President’s Staff Award on Advancing Diversity and Inclusion.

  • Jun 21

    Weaving Relations Launch Event

    1:00pm - 3:00pm

    This event has passed. We encourage you to learn more about Weaving Relations on our course webpage, which offers professional content-based video interviews.  Join us, along with guest speaker Chancellor Steven Point and other distinguished contributors, in celebrating the official launch of Weaving Relations, a course exploring Indigenous histories, people, and contexts, as well as settler colonialism in Canada, developed by the Faculty of Applied Science and the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The launch is held on National Indigenous Peoples Day, a special day within National Indigenous History Month. According to the Government of Canada, This is a day for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Mètis peoples. June 21, the summer solstice, is National Indigenous Peoples Day because of its significance within Indigenous cultures as the longest day of the year. In this spirit, we celebrate the launch of Weaving Relations. Date: June 21, 2023Time: 1:00-3:00 p.m.Location: Fred Kaiser Atrium Bannock and refreshments will be provided.Register Now Enrol in Weaving Relations For any questions, please contact the EDI.I Team in the Dean's Office at edii@apsc.ubc.ca

  • May 17

    Dialogue Day: Building your Anti-Oppression Toolbox

    10:00am - 2:30pm

    This event has passed. Unfortunately, it was not recorded. We encourage you to check out our previous Dialogue Day on Race, Allyship, and Reconciliation, which was recorded.  Hosted by the Faculties of Applied Science and Land and Food Systems   This Dialogue Day a a response to our community’s desire to develop our collective toolboxes for having critical and challenging conversations around race, gender and anti-oppression, as well as building caring and equitable spaces within our Faculties as it relates to anti-oppression in leadership, research, teaching, and the workplace. This workshop drew on Module 6 of Weaving Relations. Participants were invited but not required to complete the Building Our Anti-Racist Toolbox Module 6 prior to the event for a deeper experience. In preparation for the day, participants read Decolonization Is Not A Metaphor by Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang or listened to The Diversity Gap Podcast, exploring the gap between our good intentions for diversity and the impact of those intentions.  Dialogue Day facilitators: Dana-Lyn Mackenzie, Senior Manager of EDI.I, Faculty of Applied Science and Faculty of Land and Food Systems Dana-Lyn (born Wilson) is a member of the Hwlitsum First Nation, based in Canoe Pass, BC and a lawyer. Dana-Lyn is an elected councilor of her Coast Salish nation, serving since 2021. She has practiced criminal law and continues to practice administrative and employment law as an Associate at Acumen Law. She is a double alumna of UBC, having obtained her Bachelors of Arts and Juris Doctor degrees here.  As Senior Manager, EDI & Indigeneity, Dana-Lyn is currently leading the decolonization and Indigenization efforts in the Faculties of Applied Science and Land and Food Systems. In this role, Dana-Lyn supports EDI.I  education, engagement and support for the two Faculties. Leading the impactful UBC Orange Shirt Day Intergenerational March for the past two years has been an honour. Recently, Dana-Lyn and Erin Keely visualized and created the Weaving Relations course, an educational opportunity meeting Goal 2 of UBC’s Indigenous Strategic Plan. Dana-Lyn has worked as a university administrator since 2012 in Indigenous awareness, programming and student affairs capacities. Dana-Lyn led Indigenous focussed programming during her tenure at the Peter A. Allard School of Law with UBC, where she was recognized in 2016 for the UBC President’s Staff Award on Advancing Diversity and Inclusion. Lastly, Dana-Lyn has been a Board member of RESEAU-CMI, Networks of Centres of Excellence – Knowledge Mobilization since December 2021.  Dana-Lyn spends her spare time with her family, and being a mother of two young adults is her proudest achievement. Bashir Mohamed, EDI.I Coordinator, Faculty of Applied Science Bashir Mohamed is the EDI.I Coordinator in the Faculty of Applied Science. In his free time, he is a researcher and writer focused on Black Canadian history in Western Canada. His primary interest is researching the legacy of Black Civil Rights movement in Western Canada in the early to mid 1900s. He has written for the Canadian Encyclopedia, CBC, and The Globe and Mail. He is a current Naval Officer in the Royal Canadian Naval Reserve. Shannon Robinson, CTLT Indigenous Initiatives Educational Consultant for Anti-Racist Teaching and Learning (ART-L) Shannon has joined the Dean’s Office for a portion of the time. She grew up in Treaty 6 and Treaty 7 territories, scrambling around on either side of the Red Deer River. She holds an undergraduate degree in Art History and First Nations & Indigenous studies from the University of British Columbia. Shannon's professional background is in education, programming and curation and she has held roles at the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre, the Museum of Anthropology, and other spaces where community voices and institutions intersect. She approaches her work with the aims of disrupting colonial systems and embodying care through practice.  Sheryl Staub-French, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Faculty of Applied Science Dr. Staub-French is a Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science. She is Director of the BIM TOPiCS Lab where she leads inter-disciplinary research focused on developing methods and tools to support the digital delivery of sustainable building construction projects through effective and collaborative use of building information modeling (BIM).  She has published over 100 papers in leading journals and conferences on BIM and related topics. Her lab has made significant contributions in developing BIM guidelines and best practices; collaborating with industry and government to advance technology transfer; and developing tools to support virtual design and digital delivery. As the first Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Faculty of Applied Science, Dr. Staub-French is a strong leader and advocate in advancing EDI in engineering and leading the Faculty’s EDI initiatives. She received her BS in Civil Engineering from Santa Clara University and her MS and PhD from Stanford University.

  • Mar 21

    Dialogue Day: International Day for the Elimination of Racism

    10:15am - 2:30pm

    Hosted by the Faculties of Applied Science and Land and Food Systems This event has passed.  Watch the recording This Dialogue was a response to our community’s desire to develop our collective toolboxes for having critical and challenging conversations around race and anti-oppression, as well as building caring and equitable spaces within our Faculties as it relates to anti-oppression in leadership, research, teaching, and the workplace.  Three-Part Schedule Dialogue on Race, Allyship, and Reconciliation, including talks on:  Worldviews and Two-Eyed Seeing The Experiences of Racialized People In Canada The Principles that Guide Allyship Community-Building Lunch Building Our Anti-Racist Toolkits Workshop: Engaging In Challenging Conversations Through An Anti-Oppressive Lens, which will include: Practical Tools For Engaging In Challenging Conversations Why Allyship Is Critical to Anti-Oppression Work Scenarios, Case Studies, and Group Dialogue  Learning Objectives Engaging in critical conversations concerning the frameworks of allyship and anti-oppression work.  Cultivating community practices that support a respectful and inclusive environment for everyone.  Growing our collective toolboxes for how we can engage in challenging conversations and anti-oppression work.  Identifying tools for creating caring and equitable spaces within our Faculties, and specifically in leadership, research, teaching, and the workplace.  The workshop drew on Module 6 of Weaving Relations. Participants were invited but not required to complete the Building Our Anti-Racist Toolbox Module prior to the event for a deeper experience. In preparation for the day, participants read Decolonization Is Not A Metaphor by Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang or listened to The Diversity Gap Podcast, exploring the gap between our good intentions for diversity and the impact of those intentions.  Faciliators Dana-Lyn Mackenzie, Senior Manager of EDI.I, Faculty of Applied Science and Faculty of Land and Food Systems Dana-Lyn (born Wilson) is a member of the Hwlitsum First Nation, based in Canoe Pass, BC and a lawyer. Dana-Lyn is an elected councilor of her Coast Salish nation, serving since 2021. She has practiced criminal law and continues to practice administrative and employment law as an Associate at Acumen Law. She is a double alumna of UBC, having obtained her Bachelors of Arts and Juris Doctor degrees here.  As Senior Manager, EDI & Indigeneity, Dana-Lyn is currently leading the decolonization and Indigenization efforts in the Faculties of Applied Science and Land and Food Systems. In this role, Dana-Lyn supports EDI.I  education, engagement and support for the two Faculties. Leading the impactful UBC Orange Shirt Day Intergenerational March for the past two years has been an honour. Recently, Dana-Lyn and Erin Keely visualized and created the Weaving Relations course, an educational opportunity meeting Goal 2 of UBC’s Indigenous Strategic Plan. Dana-Lyn has worked as a university administrator since 2012 in Indigenous awareness, programming and student affairs capacities. Dana-Lyn led Indigenous focussed programming during her tenure at the Peter A. Allard School of Law with UBC, where she was recognized in 2016 for the UBC President’s Staff Award on Advancing Diversity and Inclusion. Lastly, Dana-Lyn has been a Board member of RESEAU-CMI, Networks of Centres of Excellence – Knowledge Mobilization since December 2021.  Dana-Lyn spends her spare time with her family, and being a mother of two young adults is her proudest achievement. Bashir Mohamed, EDI.I Coordinator, Faculty of Applied Science Bashir Mohamed is the EDI.I Coordinator in the Faculty of Applied Science. In his free time, he is a researcher and writer focused on Black Canadian history in Western Canada. His primary interest is researching the legacy of Black Civil Rights movement in Western Canada in the early to mid 1900s. He has written for the Canadian Encyclopedia, CBC, and The Globe and Mail. He is a current Naval Officer in the Royal Canadian Naval Reserve. Erin Keely, Indigenous Engagement Coordinator, Faculty of Applied Science Erin Keely is the Indigenous Engagement Coordinator in the Faculty of Applied Science. Erin holds a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science, where her research focused on Indigenous politics and the meaning of reconciliation in Canada, and she is currently completing her M.Ed. in Counselling Psychology here at UBC. Since 2014, Erin has worked within the post-secondary sector in roles primarily related to policy and advocacy.  As an uninvited settler, Erin is deeply grateful to live, work, and learn on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional lands of the Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Stó:lō nations. 

  • Mar 16

    Reconciliation + Design Series - Dialogue 4: Community Values and Goals in Technical Specifications

    4:30pm - 5:50pm

    This event has passed.Watch the RecordingSpeaker: Miriam Berndt B.ENV.DES, SITES AP Land-Based Art+DesignMiriam is a landscape designer and mixed-media visual artist, living in cə̓snaʔəm (so-called Marpole, Vancouver BC). She is the daughter of Theresa from Kahkewistahaw First Nation, Jim of Irish ancestry, and the step-daughter of Chris from the Six Nations of the Grand River.In August 2022, Miriam launched her practice “Land-Based Art+Design”. This practice combines both her passions, art and landscape architecture. Her design approach is rooted in the power of the land; the power to hold the history of culture and ecology from time immemorial to the present. She seeks to uncover these land-based stories to inform design expressions and innovations that confront the colonial paradigm and promote a regenerative future. Her visual art explores themes of generational healing, hybrid identity, and land-based epistemologies. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SERIES

  • Feb 28

    Black History Month: A panel conversation on the Black experience in the Faculty of Applied Science

    3:00pm - 4:30pm

    This event has passed.Watch the RecordingThis panel event was intended to be an informal conversation on the Black Experience in the Faculty of Applied Science. Students, staff, and faculty are coming together to share their experiences of being Black in a faculty that is – unfortunately – under-representative of the Black population in Canada. The event has passed but we welcome participants from all backgrounds to watch the live recording so they can learn and take the knowledge they gain to create more inclusive spaces for Black students, staff and faculty in UBC Applied Science.  Meet the PanelistsAshley Kairu        Ashley Kairu is in her final year of chemical engineering, with a passion for clean energy and sustainability. Originally from Kenya, she’s lived in Uganda and South Africa prior to her moving to Vancouver. Since moving here she’s been working hard to create strong community ties for Black and African students at UBC. She was president of the UBC Africa Awareness Initiative that strives to improve discourse surrounding and including Africa while creating a community for Africans at UBC. She is currently working with the faculty as an Equity Ambassador and is the founder and president of the UBC chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers.Natalie Chambers, RN, MSN Natalie has been a Registered Nurse for over 15 years, alumna from the UBC MSN program in 2019, and now serves as manager of the School of Nursing’s Clinical Practice Placement Unit (CPPU). Natalie & her team interacts with clinical sites across the lower mainland to ensure both undergraduate and graduate nursing students have access to relevant clinical practice experiences during their degree program. Her team ensures that each nursing student receives the quality clinical practice experience required to complete their education.In her role as CPPU manager, she also serves as co-chair of the School’s Anti-Racism Committee (ARC). Natalie co-led the development of the ARC's comprehensive workplan to foster an equity-oriented, culturally safe, and decolonizing environment. This work includes embedding an anti-racist orientation in policies and practices, and building the leadership capacity of students, faculty and staff to be agents of structural change within the university, the nursing profession and health care system.Natalie is a leader in building respectful and inclusive environments that reflect the diversity of students and nurses within the academic setting. She has also been instrumental in including students in anti-racism work and supported the development of a Nursing Student Anti-Racism Caucus. Natalie was also selected as one of the 2022 recipients of the UBC President’s Staff Awards for Antiracism and Inclusive Excellence.LINKS:School of Nursing profilePresident’s Staff Award for Advancing Anti-Racism and Inclusive ExcellenceLinked In profileBashir Mohamed Bashir Mohamed is the former EDI.I Coordinator in the Faculty of Applied Science. In his free time, he is a researcher and writer focused on Black Canadian history in Western Canada. His primary interest is researching the legacy of Black Civil Rights movement in Western Canada in the early to mid 1900s. He has written for the Canadian Encyclopedia, CBC, and The Globe and Mail.You can check out some of Bashir's work by visiting the virtual APSC Black History Month museum. 

  • Feb 23

    Reconciliation + Design Series - Dialogue 3: Indigenous ways of knowing and being, with Wanda Rockthunder

    4:30pm - 5:50pm | 6250 Applied Science

    This event has passed. Watch the recordingSpeaker: Wanda Rockthunder Wanda Rockthunder, Ph.D. Student, MBA, BBASessional Instructor, Graduate ProgramsWanda is a Nêhiyaw Iskwêw (Cree Woman) with Treaty Status from Treaty 4 Territory and a registered band member of Piapot Cree Nation (under the Indian Act) in Saskatchewan, Canada. She has been married to her devoted husband, Lorne, for 31 years, and together they have five children and twelve grandchildren. Wanda has spent a lifetime learning, and her academic background is in philosophy, education, business, and Indigenous ways of knowing. She has an undergraduate degree in Business Administration (2012) from the Paul J. Hill School of Business at the University of Regina and a graduate degree in Master of Business Administration (2021) from the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University. In addition, she is a Ph.D. student in the Civil Engineering program at UBC Okanagan and is in her second year of study.For the past 25+ years, Wanda has worked in education, facilitation, government, and non-profit within the community. She is an academic, educator, facilitator, advocate, civil rights activist, and knowledge keeper. Wanda has several other pieces of training and certificates among her postsecondary degrees as a lifelong learner. Her consulting company, Asiniy-Piyesiw & Associates Inc., focuses on assisting the Indigenous community to live a healthier lifestyle by offering healing and professional development workshops. Her business also offers workshops and education to the non-Indigenous community on Indigenous life and current events and is always looking for ways of improving life for the Indigenous people. She has spent the last ten years combining contemporary and traditional knowledge to enhance education.Currently, Wanda is a Sessional Instructor at the University of Regina and Simon Fraser University while completing her Ph.D. studies. She also does freelance contract work. Her overall goal is to assist Indigenous peoples in gaining a balance in their personal and professional lives while educating the non-indigenous community on how to work successfully and respectfully with Indigenous people.MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SERIES

  • Feb 9

    Reconciliation + Design Series - Dialogue 2: Synthesis, with Colleen O’Toole

    4:30pm | 6250 Applied Science

    This event has passed.Watch the recordingSpeaker: Colleen O’Toole P.Eng. – Project Manager Colleen has worked with Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd. since 2008, after completing a degree in Environmental Engineering at the University of Guelph.  She honors her family traditions through her Indigenous heritage and her vocation. Over the past 15 years she has become a trusted advisor to numerous municipal and Indigenous clients. A people oriented, problem solver, Colleen understands that communities are so much more than the civil utilities and infrastructure that serve them.  She loves to bring together multi-disciplinary teams to support community engagement and development of plans and designs guided by local knowledge holders that reflect the culture, traditions, and values of the specific communities she serves. Colleen specializes in asset management, sewer condition assessment and rehabilitation projects and is known for her proactive, problem-solving, relational, and communicative approach to managing projects. Colleen has extensive workshop facilitation experience with Indigenous communities specifically focused on adult education and capacity building.  She is a registered Professional Engineer, Master Municipal Construction Documents (MMCD) Certified Contract Administrator, and holds an International Association of Public Participation BC (IAP2) Planning certificate. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SERIES 

  • Feb 1

    Black Canadian history and APSC: understanding and reconciling the history of our professions

    3:00pm - 4:30pm

    Please click below to enjoy the recording of this talk.Watch the recordingThe Faculty of Applied Science welcomed all UBC students, faculty, staff and alumni to join us in celebration as we kicked off Black History Month. Bashir Mohamed, a former EDI.I Coordinator in the APSC EDI.I Office, gave a talk focused on Black Canadian history and how the history relates to our disciplines in Applied Science. Bashir has an interest in Black Canadian history and hopes to build awareness around the history of our professions and how we may reconcile with the legacy of the past.Visit the APSC Black History Month Virtual Museum

  • Jan 26

    Reconciliation + Design Series - Dialogue 1: Truth, with Kyle Monkman

    4:30pm | 2332 Main Mall

    This event has passed, and it was not recorded.  Speaker: Kyle Monkman Image Kyle was born and raised in the Red River Valley of Winnipeg, Manitoba. He has Métis and Ukrainian ancestry. In 2012, he joined the Engineering Access Program (ENGAP) for Indigenous students in engineering at the University of Manitoba. There, he was introduced to physics in an upgrading course. As of now, he is nearing the end of completing his Ph.D thesis in the department of physics. In addition, he came full circle last year when he taught the upgrading course in the ENGAP program to new-coming Indigenous students. As a student, Kyle has been involved in numerous leadership and activist roles which he plans to share at this meeting. In these difficult roles, he believes looking to our Indigenous leaders is important in this process. His work includes topics such as “financial access to physics,” “retooling the iron ring,” and an Indigenous reading group called “Nanda-Gikendan” which he named in honour of his Grandmother. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SERIES

  • Nov 18

    2SLGBTQIA+ in STEM Gathering

    3:30pm - 4:30pm

    2SLGBTQIA+ in STEM Gathering November 18 is the International Day of 2SLGBTQIA+ People in STEM. This day has been selected to celebrate and highlight the work and barriers of 2SLGBTQIA+ people in STEM. The date is symbolic of the 60th anniversary of American Astronomer and gay activist Frank Kameny’s US Supreme Court fight against workplace discrimination. Please join us for an in-person gathering on November 18 to commemorate 2SLGBTQIA+ in STEM day. This event is specifically for faculty in Applied Science who self identify as 2SLGBTQIA+. The gathering will take place in the Civil and Mechanical Engineering (CEME) Building, Room 1203 from 3:30 to 4:30 PM PST.  If you have any questions please contact the EDI.I Team at edii@apsc.ubc.ca

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